Monday, October 22, 2012

Why Peter Has No Pajamas

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And he wears his play clothes to bed…

Imagine that you had a rare skin disorder that caused your skin to develop thick, itchy scales all over your torso.

And imagine that, due to federal regulations, clothing manufacturers could only produce night clothes that are

  • made of scratchy, static-y, flame retardant polyester or
  • of skin tight cotton (and bigger sizes are still too tight, just huge in the waist and way too long).

I think maybe you would prefer to wear your play clothes to bed, too.

It’s funny how, as a society, we have certain preconceived notions about how people should live and even dress. 

I’m sure that the idea of pajamas and night gowns came from wishing to be comfortable while sleeping, and recognizing that our night clothes don’t need to be quite as sturdy as our day clothes.

No man is going to wear a suit to bed.  And sleeping in jeans is dang uncomfy.

There are also all those foundational garments that get in the way.

So we change to go to bed.

The societal norm is that everybody have a set of night clothes they wear to bed.  They probably wear them a few to several night before laundering.  And then they put on their day clothes in the morning.

But this “norm” doesn’t really make sense for everyone---oh, I expect there are lots of people out there who, like Peter, don’t have pajamas.

Am I right?   Please tell me I am.

As a society, we need to learn that just because something is different doesn’t mean that it’s wrong.  In fact, sometimes it’s more right in that particular situation.

In Peter’s case, he takes a shower or bath almost every night.  Gets creamed (heavy ointments). Dresses in soft clothes (sweats or knit pants/shorts and a t-shirt, normally).  And goes to bed.

When he wakes the next morning, he wears the same clothes.  They are still clean (mostly), after all.  If he changed into “day clothes” he would probably throw his night clothes in the wash, and then have to re-cream, because a lot of the cream is trapped in the clothing fibers--- when he leaves the shirt on, it’s against his skin and helps, but when he removes it and puts a “dry” shirt on, he needs the barrier.  He does get re-creamed as needed.

The “clean, fresh” clothes would then be just as “dirty” as the clothes he wore at night.  And both would need to be washed at the end of the day.

Can you say double the laundry? 

Not to mention, double the wardrobe?  Because he can’t wear the same pjs night after night, they would be as heavy as lead with cream build up. 

He would have to have fresh pajamas and fresh day clothes each and every day.  It’s so much easier to just have a general stockpile of clothing to choose from, rather than a drawer (or two) for night and a drawer (or two) for day.

So, Peter changes his clothes once a day, for the most part.  He likes it that way.  It keeps him comfy with minimal fuss.  He hates fuss.

He does sometimes change into jeans or more structured pants during the day when he wants to.  But when it comes to clothes, his comfort is key.

And that’s why yes, he has no pajamas. 

He has no pajamas…today!

But, if his situation or comfort level changes, his routine will change. 

In a heartbeat. 

This is just how we do things because it’s what works for him.  Right now.

Is there some (seemingly) unusual thing that your family does that makes perfect sense in your situation?

4 comments:

  1. Sounds pretty sensible to me! My son has a version of the same condition and I remember the early days when we used heavy ointments, 'luckily' he can get away with a lighter lotion that isn't so hard on clothes. Love reading Peter posts.

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  2. Thank you, Courtney. Peter loves to see pictures of himself on my blog. ;0)

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  3. I'd say that most men -- at least the ones I've known in my family, my roommates over the years, etc -- reach a point where they no longer have designated pajamas, but rather wear something like Peter is wearing in these pictures for bed. Shorts and a t-shirt has been my "uniform" for years! So I'd say Peter's just ahead of the game :).

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  4. That's a good point, FJLM. Why should kids have to wait until they are adults to choose their own sleep clothes? ;0)

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