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Saturday, July 9, 2011

The Pirate Daughter’s Promise, a review

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The Pirate Daughter’s Promise is a Christian fairytale, of sorts.   The author, Molly Evangeline, started writing this book, the first in a series of four called Pirates & Faith, as a homeschooled teenager.  In it you’ll meet Skylar McHenry, an orphan who inherited her mother’s beauty and her father’s skill with the sword (he was a pirate).  Life has treated Skye harshly, even in her young days.  No one wants an orphan, and no one especially wants a pirate’s orphan, not even her own grandfather, except her best friend Will.  That is until another pirate decides her wants her dear dad’s booty.

Suddenly, Skye finds herself lifted out of her daily drudgery into a dangerous high seas adventure.  She’ll find allies in unexpected places, turn hearts to God, gain her true love, and draw ever closer to God in her faith. 

What did we think?

I’m not sure who the author sees as the audience for this book, but we found that it was just about perfect for the 10-12 crowd.  My 11-year-old loved everything about it:  the plot, the characters, the descriptions, and just the adventure.

I liked that it’s a safe book that I was able to give to him without any concern and that I’d happily read aloud to my family.  While I can’t say that’s there’s no violence in the book (there certainly is, but I wouldn’t describe it as graphic), there’s no hint of sex, drugs, cursing, potty humor, or any of the other inappropriate garbage you tend to find on the pre-teen to teen bookshelves.

Skye is taken hostage onboard a ship full of pirates, and there is not even a smidge of indication that they might try to take her feminine virtue or anything like that.  The worst thing the captain does to her is whip her and cut her hair.  Not saying those aren’t bad enough, I’m just saying that it’s CLEAN.

That’s a big selling point.  No reason adventure can’t be clean, it’s just hard to find it that way these days.

Now, that said, from a stylistic view, the only real issue I had with The Pirate’s Daughter’s Promise was it’s heavy reliance on exposition, but that’s a pet peeve of mine.  In fact, the first chapter is straight exposition (and it’s looong), explaining to you exactly where Skye comes from, who her parents were, how they got together, her father’s history as a pirate…there’s really enough background there for another whole book.  While it was interesting backfill, it was backfill.  I very quickly began to wonder when the actual story would start…but that’s my adult mind, looking at the wires showing behind the stage props.  My son wasn’t bothered by that at all. 

So, a nice little Christian pirate adventure, safe for the upper elementary kiddos to read to themselves (provided they don’t get nightmares easily). 

The Pirate Daughter’s Promise by Molly Evangeline is available from Amazon in Paperback.

The entire 4-book Pirates & Faith Series is also available for Kindle.

Disclosure:  I received a free copy of this book from the author in the hopes that I would review it.  I was not obligated to write a positive review.  The opinions reflected here are my own.

1 comment:

  1. I read this and enjoyed it too. When my daughter gets a little older I will let her read it as well. I think it's a great book.

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