Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Knowledge Quest Maps E-Book Sale

For those of you who read my recent review on "A Child's Geography" and were interested, here's your chance to pick up the e-book version for 1/2 price. That would make it $12.48. The sale ends Friday. Here's the link:
http://www.knowledgequestmaps.com/ebooksale.htm
I highly recommend downloading the sample chapters and reading more about it first:
http://www.achildsgeography.com/volume-one/

To be perfectly honest, I do have at least one reservation after using this curriculum for a few weeks.

In chapter 2, the author mentions "bad ozone" (meaning ground-level ozone as opposed to ozone in the stratosphere) and gives a rather minimalist explanation of what causes it, creating, I think, more confusion than understanding. The implication is that any ground-level ozone is bad because God didn't put it there.

Not being up on the science of "bad ozone" myself, I was caught a little off-guard, especially as there was no reference given to find out more information on this specific topic. So I've done some of my own research...Did you know that ozone is used in some water treatment plants in place of chlorine? It's also used to kill bacteria on food prep surfaces and in swimming pools. Some hospitals in this country actually use ozone generators to sterilize operating rooms! And I've not even mentioned all the laboratory and pharmaceutical applications...

Now, if the author is really referring to "smog," smog consists of much more than just ozone and it's inaccurate to call it "bad ozone." Interestingly, she doesn't mention depletion of the "good ozone" layer in the stratosphere at all.

This is a minor issue, though, involving only a paragraph in the whole book, and frankly, there just isn't such a thing as the perfect textbook anyway, is there? As we trek through the rest of the book, I'll keep you posted if I run into anything else.

On a side note: Yes, I do want to protect our environment and our world, but it always irks me when someone presents one side and not the other...and it's not black and white. When David was in kindergarten at our local Catholic school, they had an activity where the kids imagined what each of them would do as President of the United States...my son proudly proclaimed that he would not let anyone
cut down any trees...this is what school taught him. He now understands (thanks to some intensive home intervention) that trees are a renewable resource and there are legitimate reasons for cutting down trees . Why is it that issues concerning the environment are always presented as black or white, bad or good, but social morality is just a "gray area"?

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